Voilà! Live Cooking Videos – while confined

Voilà!  Live Cooking Videos – while confined

Friday April 24th was the finale of season #1 of our Voilà Lunchtime livecast adventure!
First and foremost THANK YOU to all the viewers, & a very special thank you to all the regulars from literally all around the globe. During these 24 daily livecast rendez-vous, you provided sustained warm & joyful support which gave me a some sense of purpose in these trying times while we are all confined, waiting for the virus to pass.
By now, sadly most of us know someone who has succumbed to the coronavirus, and we are also all watching — or no longer watching in order to stay sane — the ineffective & disgusting political debacle. Even if most of us are safely at home, and in a somehow privileged situation — I sure feel mine is that — we still all go through the emotional roller coaster, so if the show helped make your ride smoother, I am super happy. You need to know that it sure eased mine tremendously, so gratitude to you all for watching & cheering! I really know that I also learned a lot from the whole process.
Do not hesitate to reach out via messenger at any point if you have cooking questions of just want to keep in touch; I would love that!
Meanwhile, stay healthy, take great great care & eat the best you can.
Much much love from the two of us.

 

P.s. The videos of all 24 shows are available, clickable, watchable further down on this page, & they all have notes & links with useful information..


A little background:

Once upon a time I was a cook! I never liked the term chef, though I did run kitchens & was called one! I never really missed the restaurant business, but never stopped cooking. In the early years of this blog I posted more recipes & articles on food, I taught cooking & went as far as taping a demo cooking show, and filming several recipes.  My aim has always been to empower people in the kitchen, not to impress them. I appreciate sophisticated techniques & truly enjoys highly skilled chefs but I was never into that kind of cooking.  My background is in French regional Southwestern food but I have been in the US since 1987 and learned so much about food here. Getting together with Pierre Joris (here producer/dishwasher/husband) in 1989 was crucial for my artistic future but also for my cooking experience: it is through Pierre that I met Diane Rothenberg & Margie Byrd who are my mentors in many ways. Both are great cooks and had open tables for many years. Diane, an anthropologist, tremendously expanded my perspectives on the history of food; Margie taught me many American staples — the best corn bread ever! & then there is my childhood friend Ariane Daguin from d’Artagnan who is an inspiration has been incredibly supportive of my food related performance work. She was an early supporter of La Garbure Transcontinentale/The Bi-Continental Chowder, a performance that included texts, videos, cooking and sharing the result with the audience. Pierre & I went on doing more of these performance & a memorable one was at the Jardin des Cinq Sens et des Formes Premières in Provence; this performance included the making of a Primordial Soup, readings, vidéos, music by Denis Brun and a Karstic-Action Painting. Here are some pix.

But my cooking debut were really early! I was born in Luchon (French Pyrenees) into the 5th generation of a family of hoteliers-restaurateurs (Hotel Poste et Golf) & my very early cooking training started when I was 6 years old with my grand-father chef Joseph Peyrafitte (whose father Louis was also a chef). Later, when I took over the family kitchen, I went to intern at award winning restaurants in France –1982: Restaurant Vanel, Toulouse, 1991: Hotel de France, Auch. Both places had 2 stars at the Michelin Guide  — then I got a few awards myself!

Anyway! forwarding to today: like everyone else we are trying to make the best of this imposed confinement & I always find solace in cooking & eating well.  So Pierre & I decided to share the prepping of our simple & healthy home cooking live. We are live both on Facebook & Instagram Monday-Friday from 12 to 12:30 —sometimes a bit longer.  Sharing & live-casting our cooking is really in line with our Domopoetic* practice.

What do we eat/cook & why?
A few years back for serious health reasons we switched to healthier, low glycemic foods & adopted the 16/8 intermittent fasting method that involves eating only during an 8-hour window & fasting for the remaining 16 hours. So we eat a variety of foods but avoid pasta, rice, potatoes, sugar, processed flour & we favor veggies, legumes, eggs, healthy whole grains, & responsibly raised meat, poultry, & seafood, some fruits…Well, you get the idea & you will discover the details in the videos below. We will keep adding them as we go. Never hesitate to ask questions or request foods recipes you would like to see demonstrated or talked about.

Voilà! Bon Appétit, stay home & healthy!

“Voilà Lunchtime” were daily live-casted on FB & IG from March 24 -April 24 2023 M-F 12:00 EST

* Domopoetics is our collaborative attempt to think, feel & make us respons/able to this/our world & it responsive to us. We do this via our private lives & public actions & performances that meander dialogically between Nicole Peyrafitte’s drawings & videos, voice-, textual & cooking work & Pierre Joris’ poems, translations & essayistic thinking.

Memorabilia:

Sitting next to a chaud-froid de volaille at the hotel Kitchen
Hotel Poste & Golf Bagnères-de-Luchon (here circa 1965)
My grand-pa Chef Joseph Peyrafitte
San-Diego 1990 : Nicole, Pierre Franey, Ariane Daguin
Award 1981
Award 1982

En Route to Idaho — Day 4 : North Platte – Rock Springs

En Route to Idaho — Day 4 : North Platte – Rock Springs

En Route to Idaho — Day 4 : North Platte, Nebraska – Rock Springs, Wyoming IMG_1892

It was very rewarding to jump in the car at 7:28AM with ambient temperature at  7ºF /-14ºc & embark on another spectacular drive. First the sun rose in our backs as we left Nebraska & then huge gorgeous clear skies welcomed us into Wyoming.

 

Shortly after our gas-&-trucker-materials pit-stop, we made a further stop at a look-out to catch the views. We were surprised to meet up with a very famous tree that grows out of a boulder of pre-historic rock. The Tree Rock is located right between Cheyenne and Laramie plumb in the middle of Interstate 80, literally hugged between its east- and west-going lanes.

The tree grows out of a crack in a pre-Cambrian pink Sherman granite boulder formed anywhere from 1-4 billion years ago. (The granite that is, the tree is somewhat younger, but that species of pine can live as long as 2,000 years.)

As read on one of the The Tree Rock —a.k.a “the lone tree”— tourist-info tablets, the transcontinental railroad tracks of the Union Pacific Railroad lie a short distance to the west, as lies the Ames Monument, erected to commemorate the highest point of the railroad’s route  honor the Ames brothers.  I remembered very well that Augustus Saint-Gaudens had chiseled the bas-reliefs —from Quincy, Massachusetts, granite! — & architect H. H. Richardson designed the pyramid (as well as the Albany City Hall!) I have worked on several project on Augustus Saint Gaudens & even though this is not my favorite work of his, I was delighted to find his work here, since I have seen almost all ASG public works.



We continued our journey towards Rock Spring thru more beautiful landscapes where the speed limit went up to 80 miles p/h! I will never forget the golden pale yellows of the endless prairies illuminating the snow, the light blue sky & the pinkish granite boulders.

Our picnic at the Ames monument was a little less fancy today —since we are starting to run out of provisions— but was still nourishing: hummus, bread, cheese, apples & nuts. Tonight we went out to dinner at a local restaurant (attracted at first by the name, The Coyote Creek Steakhouse) where Pierre had a decent sirloin, turned down all five of the offered potato-versions, settling for green beans while & I had a bison burger — sans buns but with more green beans.

Today we also passed the 2000 miles marker. One more day on the road before Boise.  Tomorrow through Pocatello to give a thought to Pierre’s old friend Ed Dorn & on to Blackfoot to visit the potato museum.

En Route to Idaho — Day 3 : Des Moines – North Platte

En Route to Idaho — Day 3 : Des Moines – North Platte

Day #3  Des Moines, Iowa – North Platte, Nebraska: 400 Miles 644Kms
We left Des Moines a little after 9AM since we opted for a lighter driving day . It was 19ºF /-7ºc when we left Iowa. The light fog wrapping the windmills was beautifully quixotic. The fog had cleared by the time we reached Nebraska and clear skies accompanied us to North Platte.

We filled up the car & had breakfast before leaving so we stopped only for lunch. No rest stop extravaganza today, au contraire we opted to lunch at the Mormon Island State Recreation Area conveniently located off I-80. Named for the winter stopover used by Mormon emigrants heading westward we enjoyed lunching by the frozen lake and watching some locals ice fishing.

We then headed to North Platte where we had a blast visiting the Buffalo Bill residence’s outdoors grounds since the location is closed for the winter. On this Sunday afternoon North Platte was a pretty empty town and very few of its 24 000 inhabitants were visible. But the world’s largest Rail Yard sure was! After spotting the longest train we had ever seen going through town, we decided to visit the train yard and got there right on time to climb to the top of the The Golden Spike Tower and Visitor Center & what an amazing view!

This location was chosen because of its close proximity to the Platte river and to Grand Island. Nebraska’s been a railroad center since the Union Pacific Railroad first reached here in July 1866 & that first train rolled through what was known at the time as “Hell on Wheels” town. Today Bailey Yard, named for former Union Pacific president Edd H. Bailey, is the world’s largest train yard. Covering a massive 2,850 acres, each day Bailey Yard manages 10,000 railroad cars. Of those, 3,000 are sorted to make sure the cargo reaches its final destination. We sure did see some action from the Golden Spike Tower. We watched a gorgeous sunset and went to find our motel for the night.

Again we were able to make our lunch, dinner, coffees & teas. Lunch was a tuna fish salad into which I mixed the last of the grains — faro, rye & oats mixture — diced daikon, carrot, celery, red pepper, dressed w/ PJ’s Meyer lemon vinaigrette. Pierre had cheddar I had goat cheese with bran crackers,nuts & a clementine. For tonight’s dinner we finished the lentils as a soup, made a salad & used the last of PJ’s dressing, Blue Iowa Maytag plus apples & walnuts for dessert. Tomorrow a longer ride: trying to get to Rock Spring Wyoming!

And now if you have travel so far with us you might want to watch a freight train passing by for almost 3 minutes — and that is not even the full train. Mesmerizing!

En Route to Idaho — Day 1 : Brooklyn – Maumee

En Route to Idaho — Day 1 : Brooklyn – Maumee

IMG_1572
January 1 2016

Nice first day on the road to Idaho. Smooth ride with with very little traffic . We left Bayridge, Brooklyn  at 7:56 & got to Maumee, Ohio 5:58PM. We drove 566 miles (910 kms) out of 2475 miles (3983 kms) to get to Boise Idaho. We crossed New-Jersey, Pennsylvania & two third of Ohio.
We made our coffees, teas, lunch (Braised d’Artagnan Berkshire Pork; Lentil Salad; Greens, Goat Yogurt w/ Cinammon/Stevia & Roasted Seeds) & dinner (Red Miso Soup with Oats,Rye & Farro; Pumpernickel Buttered Bread; Hard Boiled Egg, Carrot & Celery, Cheddar w/ Apples & Cashew Nuts.
We listened to France Culture, NPR, John Coltrane, Matthew Ship, Michael Bisio & Cheikha Rimitti.
Below is the photo reportage, stay tuned!

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Pennsylvania

IMG_1562

Sweet Sweet Muffins (No Sugar, No Wheat)

Sweet Sweet Muffins (No Sugar, No Wheat)

muffinpansFor Marge Byrd who taught me how to bake the American way.
Above: the apron top she stitched for me in 1993! 

Following a low-glycemic, no sugar diet doesn’t mean you have to eat boring foods…au contraire! If both Pierre and I have been successfully keeping up with this way of eating it is because there are actually plenty of other choices. It is all about using different ingredients & learning how to use them. This muffins recipe—& the Mooch-O-colat too— are good examples how it can be done. It took me a while to figure it out — but Voilà! le result is yummy! Can be served for brunch or dessert or any thing else you can imagine! Below are pictures of the some possible combinations.

muffins

for 12 Cast Iron Cookware Muffin Pan
(note to my friend Don Byrd: They are Lodge’s cast iron pans & I found them on Amazon)
Preheat oven 375 degres
Cooking : 30 minutes.

In the blender add :
1/2 a green apple with the skin,
1/2 lb silk tofu,
1/4 cup coconut oil,
1/4 tsp stevia, ( this is the brand I like to use)
1/2 vanilla bean (inside scraped),
1 cup cashew milk (any almond, soy, rice milk will do just make sure they have NO sugar added),
1 pinch of salt,
1 beaten egg at the end & mix it by hand.

In a large bowl combine :
1/4 cup buckwheat flour,
1/4 cup teff flour,
(can be substituted for buckwheat tho I really like the crunchy taste of it. I do buy the regular teff & then grind it myself in the coffee grinder),
1/2 cup coconut flour,
1/2 cup oat bran,
1 grated lemon,
1 grated orange
1 tsp baking powder.

Incorporate the blender’s  liquid content into the dry ingredient bowl. Mix gently but thoroughly. Grease your muffin pans generously with coconut oil. Fill the molds & bake for 30 minutes at 350°. You can also bake this batter in a cast iron pan and then slice it as you see below.

oeufplatkalesalad
Sweet sweet muffins w/ sunny side eggs, raw kale salad, red berry chia jam. Muffins, oeufs au plat, salade de choux frisée crue, confiture de baie aux graines de chia

Suive un régime pauvre en glucides et sans sucre ne doit pas être ennuyeux , au contraire! Et si avec Pierre nous arrivons à le suivre sans difficultés c’est par ce que: 1) c’est bon et 2) il y a beaucoup de choix, seulement voilà — il m’a fallu les trouver! La recette d’aujourd’hui — comme celle du blog précédent, la Mooch-O-colat  — en sont deux très bon exemples. J’ai toujours beaucoup aimé les muffins et ça m’a pris quelque temps à créer une recette pauvre en glucides et sans sucre ajouté qui plaisait à tous. Voilà le résultat et vous allez vous régaler!

Chauffer le four  à 200 degrés. Cuisson : 30 minutes

Dans le mixer ajouter:
1/2 pomme verte avec la peau,
250gr de tofu soyeux,
80ml d’huile de noix de coco,
1/4 de cuillère à café de stevia,
1/2 gousse de vanille,
1 tasse de lait de noix de cajou (ou bien utiliser du lait d’amande, de soja, de riz sans sucre ajouté),
1 pincée de sel,
1 oeuf battu et le mélanger à la main à la fin.

Dans un grand bowl ajouter:
25gr de farine de sarrasin,
25gr tasse de farine de teff,
(peut être remplacer par plus de sarrasin mais le teff apporte une texture agréable. J’achète les graines de teff entières et les passe au moulin à café),
55 gr de farine de noix de coco,
75 gr de son d’avoine,
1 citron (zestes seulement),
1 orange (zestes seulement),
1 c. à café de levure chimique.

Incorporer les ingrédients liquides du mixer dans le bol des ingrédients secs. Bien mélanger. Graisser les moules généreusement avec de l’huile de noix de coco. Les remplir et cuire à four chaud pour 30 minutes. Vous pouvez aussi utiliser une poêle en fonte ou un moule à gâteau.

muffinyogurtberries
Sweet sweet muffins with goat yogurt sauce (cinnamon, stevia), seeds & fresh or frozen wild berries.

Muffins avec yaourt de chèvre parfumé à la stevia et à la cannelle, myrtilles fraîches ou congelées, graines grillées.

 

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